Wednesday, 18 September 2013

Using Up Every Last Bit & Pattern Review Kwik Sew 2498

I have a new resolution, because of this:


Unfinished cushion project - furry scraps (what on earth will I do with these) - dressmaking scraps

My scraps are becoming a health and safety issue and also being ruthlessly logical it is better to use up scraps while the machine is threaded with the right colour and has the right needle in etc. Rather than stashing the bits and never using them, but thinking things like, "Gosh, I really must use up some scraps", every time I see the teetering pile...

I love making things to wear and am not so keen on making anything homey (although I do quite enjoy making small gifts). To increase the likelihood of using up scraps I need to start making small garments (well obviously they have to fit someone or that would be pointless). Knickers, maybe? Camisoles?

Anyway I searched the internet to try to find appropriate patterns. I didn't find many, maybe I was tired and I missed the patterns or maybe there really aren't many that fit this particular need. I found that Kwik Sew had a lot of basic styles and I want things I have made to be reasonably timeless and lasting so this pattern seemed like a good fit for using small pieces.





I have never sewn with a Kwik Sew pattern before so I had a surprise when I undid the packet.




Where are the miles of flimsy crumpled tissue I usually struggle with? Where are the tiny indistinguishable size lines all printed in the same colour? This pattern is one I hope to use over and over again (and since I won't trace a pattern like I "should" unless I absolutely have to for some vital alteration reasons), the extra strength is appreciated and made me mind less that it cost a little more than the other big pattern brands. Sometimes you just want to cut and sew, especially if you are using up scraps!

Another surprise was the seam allowance. Only quarter of an inch, which being used to 5/8ths inch felt a bit scary. Not much to play with. Then it occurred to me that it was probably this width so that the seams could be finished faster.

I began to get the idea that this pattern might be, well, kwik.


Here is my finished camisole. I made it from white broderie anglaise scraps left over from the peasant top I made in the summer. I was worried the fabric would be too see through on a closer fitting design, so I backed it with a thin white cotton lining harvested from a kaftan I have thrifted that is destined to become something else one day. Buying lining to use up scraps would defeat the object to my mind!




Literally as I was finishing the camisole I realised there was no need for me to use facings as I could have just lined it instead of treating the fabrics as one. For some reason I just blindly followed the instructions WHERE WAS MY BRAIN. So I have facings that show through the fabric needlessly, arghh! I have been consoling myself by saying this was an experiment with scraps and at least I have tried the pattern as intended, but truth be told I am a little cross with myself.

Excuse blurry pic & squint - sun in eyes

So anyway the instructions were clear and there was no difficulty with method, but fitting was more tricky. I made the pattern according to my bust measurement and the front fits how I think it is meant to. That is the problem with artists impressions, I would so much prefer a photo of every style. They leave too much open to interpretation. Anyway I see a relatively straight style fitted across the bust with looseness under. I think this is what I made. However the back was enormous. I just took a couple of inches (seriously!) off each side of the back piece and called it done, but I could have gone down at least two sizes across the back. My thoughts are:

1. It could be the style as the only view photographed does seem quite loose under the model's arm (the same pieces are used for views C & D) and thinking about it if the camisole was too fitted it wouldn't slip over the head and shoulders.

2. I could have made the smaller size and done a FBA. It would be a good pattern to experiment with this alteration since it is so simple BUT since I got the fit I wanted would there be any advantage in doing an FBA? I am unsure whether I should just do what works or try to do things "properly". Any thoughts?




I have just a couple of small scraps left of this fabric now. I think they would make a lovely contrast collar for a blouse/shirt so I am hanging on to them. (No I am not crazy enough to make a shirt especially to use up these scraps as where will it end. Possibly with insanity.) Do you know of any clothing patterns that are good for using up those awkward bits left after cutting out your garment (particularly wovens)? Any/all suggestions gratefully received!

Happy sewing,

'til next time!


14 comments:

  1. I really like it. It is very cute.

    As for scraps. Ugh. They last forever. I have a few drawers filled with them. I save them for facings, pockets, etc. I was thinking of saving them to someday use in a quilt - but I just don't have quilt-making patience!!

    I always feel so guilty throwing fabric away!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I have always found Kwik Sew patterns to be good.They have quite a few nice lingerie ones and swim wear too.
    I have so many scraps it is untrue.Plus on my recent packing-summer-stuff-away-and-digging-out-the-winter-stuff-spree I decided some of my things I didn't want to wear any more.Instead of taking to a charity shop,because the fabric was either too nice or too useful,I decided to keep them for cutting up...now I have another large pile of "stuff".
    My recent bag/deer/pot holder/journal cover/baby quilts/rugs etc.etc.are all to use up scraps and it is surprising what you can make from nothing when you put your mind to it!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I have always found Kwik Sew patterns to be good.They have quite a few nice lingerie ones and swim wear too.
    I have so many scraps it is untrue.Plus on my recent packing-summer-stuff-away-and-digging-out-the-winter-stuff-spree I decided some of my things I didn't want to wear any more.Instead of taking to a charity shop,because the fabric was either too nice or too useful,I decided to keep them for cutting up...now I have another large pile of "stuff".
    My recent bag/deer/pot holder/journal cover/baby quilts/rugs etc.etc.are all to use up scraps and it is surprising what you can make from nothing when you put your mind to it!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Great camisole. I have never used kwik sew but the heavier weight paper appeals. I usually use scraps for pocket linings and hair accessories for kids. :) x

    ReplyDelete
  5. I have too many scraps too!! It's overwhelming. I love what you've made. :)

    ReplyDelete
  6. Love the top! Looks really nice!
    I have a huge pile of scraps building up in my sewing room, so much that I am seriously considering learning to quilt, to get rid of them...

    ReplyDelete
  7. Those are really cute little tops. You can never have too many cute white tops, in my book, so useful. I have a scary amount of scraps too!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Oh, and I thought you'd make a camisole from the furry scraps! (kidding (: ) The camisole from broderie anglaise is very pretty and I'm sure will be a useful garment to have in the closet.

    The problem with sewing is the more you sew, the more scraps you create. It's inescapable. I sort my scraps by size: about the right size for pocket and waistband facings; 1/2 yard or big enough for a part of a garment; less than a yard or big enough for a small garment. Smaller than facing-size gets thrown out unless I can cut a piece of it for my ongoing scrap quilt.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I wondered how long it would be until someone suggested I make a fluffy bikini! Those scraps are from long ago kid's projects and I am at a loss to know what to do with them now. But I really like your scrap sorting system, I am going to adopt it. I feel if the leftovers are sorted by size I am more likely to use them when the right project arises - at the moment they are one hopeless mass that is a nightmare to rummage through.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So thank you very much for your suggestion, and to everyone who commented!

      Delete
  10. I started quilting as a way to use up scraps but I get very specific ideas about what I want a quilt to look like - everything very coordinated - so I end up buying more fabric for quilts and the scraps continue to accumulate. I will soon have a granddaughter and will be able to use some of them for her.

    Sometimes you can use scraps as trim. If it's a print buy a coordinating solid and use the scrap for collar, cuffs, pockets, or decorative applique. Of course that solution involves buying more fabric, which makes more scraps so it never ends.
    http://www.lynnspace.com/blog/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And by the way, I love Kwik Sew patterns. Some of them have normal seam allowances.

      Delete
  11. Oh, that's good to know, because it made me nervous - I like room to manoeuvre! I like your idea about contrasting trims, but am not so sure about quilting. I imagine lots of patience is needed (as well as accuracy!). But I won't discount it entirely as so many have mentioned it - maybe it isn't as difficult as I think.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Such very lovely, classic tops. I'm especially fond of the peasant sleeve style on. I adore that style of shirt. Despite their somewhat boxy shape, they usually have a real knack for flattering one's figures (at least in my experience).

    I run into the situation with scraps in my paper crafting, too. I don't like to throw out anything bigger than a speck that could be used elsewhere, so sometimes I'll challenge myself to make projects using only scraps for the paper. It's quite fun really, as you often come up with colour and pattern combos that you might otherwise never have put together.

    Thinking of you, my lovely friend, and sending countless happy start of autumn wishes your way!

    ♥ Jessica

    *PS* Thank you so tremendously much for each and every one of your caring, wonderful recent blog comments.

    ReplyDelete